Save $12.00 on Clotheslines!

First, it was government lightbulb task-forces.  Next, it was creating an entire Crown Corporation to oversee the energy efficiency program.  Now, it's subsidized clotheslines.

That's right, Albertans will receive instant rebates of $12.00 on any clotheslines they purchase.  The government claims the average family does 400 loads of laundry every year, and that the cost of drying all these clothes is as much as $120.00 a year.  Assuming that 1/3 of the year Alberta is sufficiently warm to actually hang clothes up to dry outside, we are looking at savings of tens of dollars thanks to the NDP's clothesline program (assuming that the carbon tax and coal phase-out have zero impact on utility prices)

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The Light-bulb Saga Isn't Over

A few weeks ago, we told you the story of the NDP government hiring Ontario firm Ecofit to install energy efficient light bulbs in households around the province.

As if light bulb task forces weren't loony enough on their own (especially in the midst of record unemployment and insane deficits) we now know that there's even more to the story.

On Calgary radio yesterday, David Gray from AIM Energy Pros revealed that when the government of Alberta initially requested bids on the project, the request for proposal was "tailor-made" for Ecofit.  The government didn't want to look at other companies - for whatever reason they had already made up their mind.  

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They Don't Understand how Budgets Work

In the midst of the global economic recession of 2008, the minority government of Stephen Harper's Conservatives put forward a budget with a significant deficit.  The Harper government's worst budget had $56B in deficit spending, partly because of economic stimulus that many conservatives opposed.

It took a few years, but the Harper government returned the budget to surplus all the while reducing the federal tax burden to its lowest levels in decades.  There are legitimate critiques to be made of their record, but the overall handling of the economy was by most accounts quite strong.

We're seeing a similar story playing out in Saskatchewan right now.  With low oil and gas prices, that province's government is feeling the economic crunch.  Their new budget increases consumption taxes, but they're reducing income taxes, reducing corporate taxes, and there's a plan to be back to balance in 2019-2020.

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ACW on the Road

We're excited to announce we will be headed out on another tour of the province this spring.  The Alberta Can't Wait RV is ready to come out of its winter hibernation and bring our message of a competent, united, principled alternative to the NDP all across the province.  

We're looking for service clubs, barbecues, chambers of commerce meetings, and anywhere else we can share our message of uniting conservatives.  

Last year, some of our most rewarding moments were when people approached us - not necessarily knowing what we were about – and who upon learning about our goal of conservative unity, signed up on the spot.  They shared our goal of bringing conservatives together under a single banner in time for the next election.

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Back-Door Tax Grab

Workers' Compensation (WCB) is entirely funded by our province's employers. As you know, WCB provides insurance for those who are injured on the job, providing a safety net for both employers and workers.

The WCB takes in more money every year than it doles out, providing a cushion for unforeseen expenses. Each year, that surplus is returned to employers.

It appears that the NDP now wants to take any future WCB annual surplus and dump it straight into government general revenue, rather than send it back to hardworking employers.

Talk about a back-door tax hike!

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Light-bulbs Used to Symbolize Good Ideas

"How many New Democrats does it take to screw in a light-bulb?"

"How dim does the government think Albertans are?"

"No amount of free light-bulbs will brighten up the NDP's approval numbers"

Humour is the only coping mechanism Albertans have when they see the latest abuse of taxpayers' money by the NDP.  Rick Bell explains the NDP's latest scheme to spend all of that extra carbon tax revenue:

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Alberta Needs Unconditional Love

To love unconditionally is a tall order - setting aside any self-interest or expectations of reciprocity is not something we typically expect of people, and certainly not politicians.  But to get our province back on track, we need leaders who will set aside personal ambition and the slights and grievances of the past.  We need leaders who won’t demand narrow conditions in order to unite.  We need someone who will love Alberta unconditionally.

Albertans have overwhelmingly reached the same conclusion: we need to unite conservatives in order to defeat the NDP.  Poll after poll after poll are showing the same results - more than half of Albertans and an overwhelming majority of PC and Wildrose supporters want a competent, principled, united alternative to the NDP.

As Jason Kenney said last weekend when it comes to unity "...everyday Albertans can't even conceive why certain political elites won't just get 'er done." 

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The NDP's Executive Orders

While executive orders south of the border have been grabbing all the headlines, closer to home the NDP is making bizarre decisions of its own.

Last week they repealed two sections of the act that governs AIMCo, the Crown corporation tasked with managing Alberta's Heritage Fund.

They've decided that having no experience investing shouldn't preclude someone from being in charge of billions of Albertans' dollars.

Rachel Notley's unqualified Finance Minister thinks he should be able to appoint whomever he wants.

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Wildrose Consultation Survey

Today, the Wildrose party released a survey for its membership about charting their course forward.  In recent weeks, Wildrose has firmly opened up the door to conservative unity and we are grateful to our friend Brian Jean.

Brian has said that Wildrose members will be given the final say on the future of the party.  

This seems to be the first step in that process.  The survey asks questions about the name a new party should take, members’ preferences for delegated conventions versus membership-wide votes, thresholds for changing party policy, and the structure a new party should take.

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The NDP's Secretive Curriculum Rebuild

You may have seen this story in the Metro papers last week detailing how secretive the NDP government is being about its overhaul of the education curriculum.  

The former director of curriculum development for Edmonton Public schools, Stuart Wachowicz, stated that he had "never before seen or heard of a curriculum process so far removed from the public, so far removed from accountability, and so far removed from the interest of Alberta children.”

It's a damning criticism of the secretive "expert working groups" - the people the NDP have tasked with this monumental undertaking.  Their backgrounds, qualifications, and names are all being hidden from the public.  We also don't know how the committees are structured, who is presenting to them, or the information being presented.

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